Mudita Journal

Eckhart Tolle Archive

The skyscraper and the cherry blossom: Why Objectivism needs secular spirituality

After my "Pointing to the reality" post, my intelligent Rand-loving friend was rubbed the wrong way by my suggestion that cherry blossoms are on the same level with skyscrapers: Skyscrapers give us an appreciation for things as they could be, for the ways man changes the world. How can cherry blossoms compare? Here is my reply. I like your summary of the worldview Ayn Rand articulates, about man's life as the standard of value, and how much meaning there is at that level, of shaping the world around us to fit our needs and to support our life and happiness. I ...

Pointing to the reality

I wrote this in answer to a friend, a relative newcomer to Ayn Rand's philosophy, who inquired about my interest in spirituality and why I would say something like "The divine is all around us." Why use the same words that religions use? I just got back from a 20-minute nap in the sunshine in the grass, in the park down the street. On my way to my favorite patch of grass on the embankment, I was approached by a young black missionary named Marcelle who was carrying a bible and was eager to talk. Sweet kid, seemed lonely, and was ...

Flow with whatever may happen

July 13, 2012  ·  Category: Buddhism, Eckhart Tolle, FLOW, Meditation, Mindfulness

Thanks to Michael Strong of FLOW for bringing this lovely graphic to my attention. He writes: "Although this is Buddhist, it is similar to the Taoist usage of 'Flow,' which was one of our original inspirations."

Stressed out? A creative visualization from Eckhart Tolle

May 9, 2012  ·  Category: Eckhart Tolle, Meditation, Mindfulness

Marsh brought the following passage to my attention, from Eckhart Tolle's The Power of Now. I remember it from my days of listening nonstop to Tolle's audiobooks. I like this passage a lot. If at any time you are finding it hard to get in touch with the inner body, it is usually easier to focus on your breathing first. Conscious breathing, which is a powerful meditation in its own right, will gradually put you in touch with the body. Follow the breath with your attention as it moves in and out of your body. Breathe into the body, and feel your ...

Treating chronic pain through radical acceptance

A new friend asked for my advice about using meditation to treat chronic pain. I would assume that, like me, you have consulted many doctors and they aren't able to do much to help. In this case, one of the most powerful therapies is what we might call "radical acceptance." The basic premise is that we often don't realize how much of our suffering is of our own creation, created by how we react to the pain in our body. Sometimes the core of pain itself can be like a grain of sand in an oyster; but through our irritated reaction, it ...

An enlightened view of enlightenment

December 13, 2010  ·  Category: Adyashanti, Buddhism, Eckhart Tolle, Intellectual, Mindfulness

I haven't written much on Mudita Journal about the concept of enlightenment, but it's been in the background for me for several years, ever since I discovered the teachings of Adyashanti (and Eckhart Tolle, before him). Perhaps I should write a post about it, sometime, for the benefit of those who are unfamiliar, who see it as a "mystical" concept, or who are skeptical that it has any value. Meantime, I know a few of my readers are acquainted with Adyashanti — or "Adya," as students often call him — and his teachings. In any case, a friend said the ...

The gentle art of blessing

December 11, 2010  ·  Category: Adyashanti, Buddhism, Eckhart Tolle, Mindfulness

I was contacted today by a fellow student of Adyashanti's teachings, who lives in Albuquerque and was wondering about the status of the group I had tried starting there, years ago. It turns out she has a blog as well, called A Peaceful Human Race. Reading it, I was moved by this post: for the last couple months, i've been reading the gentle art of blessing by pierre prandervand. a little excerpt from the book can give you a taste of what this book is about, or you could click the title of the book above, order, and check it out yourself. pradervand ...

Suffering as a form of spiritual guidance

In response to my post on the significance of suffering, Andrew ends his insightful comments with: So in that sense I think the issue of suffering is important: I think denials of it lie at the root of many problems. I do wonder, though, if this gets at what you are talking about. I sense you may be referring to something more. Good points. And yes, I am groping for something more, here. In a nutshell, it's this: I have come to the view that suffering, if you respond to it correctly, will open you to a sense of deep and profound connection with ...

Mudita Forum is now at Google Groups

Check out the new Mudita Forum, if you think you might be interested. The purpose of Mudita Forum is to provide a stimulating, thoughtful environment for discussing Eastern consciousness-raising practices — such as meditation, mindfulness, and the cultivation of presence — while using Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism as a basic philosophical frame-of-reference. The old group got lost when I was changing servers a couple years ago, but recently I've been contacted by new people wishing to join. My hope for the new group is that it will be much like the old one: low-volume, high-quality, and stimulating on many levels. I sent invites ...

Applying Eckhart Tolle’s Teachings

September 19, 2006  ·  Category: Buddhism, Eckhart Tolle, Mindfulness

Reader William Vietinghoff asked me if he could pose some questions here for other students of Eckhart Tolle's work. I told him I'm happy to oblige. He writes: I am aware of Eckhart Tolle's work in audiobook form. I have heard The Power of Now, Practicing the Now, Gateways to the Now, and Stillness Speaks. Let me preface my questions by saying that as a result of his approach / suggestions I use the opportunities when I am driving or walking (and not distracted by people) to draw my attention to my inner self, to my surroundings, to awareness of my body, as ...